ROSEBIRD KENNELS

- HOME OF LABRADOR RETRIEVERS, WEST HIGHLAND TERRIERS & SCOTTISH TERRIERS.


PROBLEMS WITH THE PLUMBING

PROBLEMS WITH THE PLUMBING

i.e. Toilet training

 

Often the first question we are asked when clients bring a young puppy for training is 'What is the secret of successful house training. They have tried smacking the pup when it wets in the house, rubbing its nose in its droppings, and putting paper down on the laundry floor ­all to no avail.  There are no magic remedies, but there is a simple and effective teaching process which will bring about speedy results.

 

The need to urinate or defecate is as natural a function for dogs as it is for humans.  It takes a long time to toilet train a baby, yet puppies are expected to know what to do almost immediately!  At eight weeks old a puppy has little bladder or bowel control but it will develop them rapidly over the next couple of months.  To teach or condition a puppy to eliminate in a correct area we need to know two things, that is, the natural behaviour of wolves and dogs.

 

Remember that if we reinforce or reward a response such as urinating outside with something which is important to the puppy such as a piece of food, then the puppy will tend to respond by urinating outside again when it is stimulated by a full bladder.

House training should start the moment you arrive home with your puppy so that you avoid having any 'accidents' right from the beginning.  We suggest that you start before you even enter the house by taking the puppy to the area you want it to use.  Let it explore the area and, if it obliges buy urinating or defecating, praise it and give it a small piece of food.

 

Incidentally the spot that you choose for the toilet area should not be too far from the house as you wouldn’t want to walk too far on cold wet nights!

 

Now take your pup inside and follow these instructions:

1.     Set your watch or alarm clock to ring in one hour.  When the time is up, walk your puppy outside to 'the same area' and stay there for five minutes or so. If it urinates or defecates, praise it and give it a small piece of food, then take it inside and set your alarm for another hour, and so on.  If your puppy does not oblige during the five minute period, take it inside but go out ten minutes later and keep doing this until your patience is rewarded.  You will quickly work out your puppy's own rhythm.

2.     Also, take the puppy out as soon as it wakens from sleep, after eating or drinking and when it has been chewing on a toy or after prolonged play.

     3   Watch its body language carefully for any signs which may indicate a need to go out. 

          Circling and sniffing are often signs that it wants to go to the toilet.

 

* REMEMBER  -  PERSEVERANCE IS THE KEY …..  NOT INTOLERANCE

 

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